Growing Up In The 1950s

nineteenfifties

 

Many members of the Silver Connections group were born or grew up in the 1950s and if they were born in 1946 or after, are part of  the ‘Baby Boom’ generation.

Almost exactly nine months after World War II ended, “the cry of the baby was heard across the land,” as historian Landon Jones later described the trend.  Many of the soldiers that came home from WWII settled down and had families. After the depression and years of war, life seemed peaceful and secure. More babies were born in 1946 than ever before: 3.4 million, 20 percent more than in 1945. This was the beginning of the so-called ‘baby boom.’ In 1947, another 3.8 million babies were born; 3.9 million were born in 1952.

The United States in the 1950s was also the world’s strongest military power. The GI Bill enabled many men to obtain a college education. The US economy was booming, and the fruits of this prosperity–new cars, suburban houses and other consumer goods–were available to more people than ever before.

 

If you were raised in the 1950’s, these may apply to you:

Home was a safe haven—no need for a security system. Many families never locked their doors.

You could walk or ride your bike alone to school, and your mom would be at home when you got there after school.

Homework aside, you could play until just before 6, when the family would sit down together for a planned supper.

You knew your parents loved you, even though at times it might have felt (literally) like a tough love—ever get spanked with a wooden spoon? Your parents were consistent, always wanting something better for you than what they had for themselves growing up.

There was no Nintendo, PlayStation, x-boxes, video games or iPods in the 1950’s. No cell phones, computers or TV’s in bedrooms. No idea what the internet, chat rooms or Facebook would be!

You had friends your own age, who most likely lived in your neighborhood.  You knew their families and they knew yours.

You had record players for your 45 RPMs.

There were trees to climb and fall out of, without suing anyone when you did.

You may have had packets of baseball cards, with a slab of gum the same size. How about hula hoops, the Mickey Mouse Club and Howdy Doody Time on TV or your lunchbox with milk in a carton.

You may have drunk out of a garden hose and no one thought it was dirty.

You may have had a one-foot deep plastic swimming pool that took forever o fill.

Your telephone number may have had a lettered prefix you had to memorize, like Sunset 2- 4848.

You used big cardboard boxes to build forts in the back yard in a tree.

Do you remember fireflies, milk in glass bottles delivered to your house each day, board games like Candyland and Monopoly, chalk for the sidewalk and a game of hopscotch or jacks?

Bazooka bubble gum with a comic inside and your own wrist watch, with maybe Davy Crockett, Mickey or Minnie Mouse on the dial?

How about family vacations and road trips each summer, waiting an hour after eating before you could go swimming, playing outside after supper each night in summer until your Mom called you in?

Did you always run so hard you were out of breath or laugh so hard that your sides hurt?

How about S&H green stamps from the grocery store and gas stations, licking the backs and pasting them in a book?

Watching a drive-in movie on a Friday night, 15 cent burgers from McDonald’s or roller skates.

 

Beginning in 1935, Polling Company AIPO spent decades ringing strangers up and asking them how happy they were—a move that actually yielded usable data. The fifties saw a surge of people claiming they were very happy, peaking between 1955 and 1960 at around forty percent. That’s the highest it’s ever been.  This isn’t just ‘happy’ but ‘very happy’. A different study measuring average happiness across the decades also placed the fifties as peak smiling time.

For all these positive attributes about this decade, and there were many, what were the negatives?  Racial discrimination and segregation existed. Women were expected to stay at home, be a wife and raise the children. There were puritanical attitudes toward sex. Families were still hurting from the loss of brothers, fathers and sons from the war. There was the McCarthy era, where thousands of Americans were accused of being communists or communist sympathizers.

If you were born and/or raised in the 1950’s – was it a happier, simpler decade?

Was being a child in the 1950’s ideal?

If the consensus of the 1950’s being a stable, harmonious decade is true for many, it appeared to be one that did not last long.  It seemed to crumble for good during the tumultuous 1960’s and the “me” decade of the 1970’s.

 

A look at a family dinner in 1950-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8kJzBJrOkU

 

 

Laura Kay House, MA, is the founder and owner of Silver Connections, located in the Triangle area of North Carolina. Silver Connections provides numerous socializing opportunities through events and travel, personal service, quality members and connections for age 55+ (mostly Boomers!) active and single adults. 

 

SILVER CONNECTIONS WEBSITE:

www.silverconnections.org

 

 

Blog Contributors:  Baby Boomers  R We, History Channel and Listverse

 

Advertisements

Studies Connect Socializing With Quality Of Life

 The relationship between physical activity and vitality is well-documented, but multiple recent studies have also revealed an increasingly stronger link between social interaction and mental and physical well-being for those age 55+.

While socialization is critical for all people, regardless of age, those age 55+ can be more susceptible to isolation. Many have spent a considerable portion of their lives in the company of others – be it in the workplace or raising children or both.  For those age 55+, possibly being single, relocating, children leaving the house, retirement…..the opportunities for socialization often decrease.

Research has indicated that an active social lifestyle is more important than ever in helping maintain a sharp mind, remain connected to the world around them, increase feelings of happiness, and develop a sense of belonging.

Various studies have shown that socializing can produce the following positive effects:

Improved mental health: Symptoms of depression and memory problems are comon. In fact, approximately seven million people over the age of 60, experience symptoms of depression  and it is estimated that dementia touches at least one in seven people over age 70.  Having consistent human contact and interaction can reduce both, recent studies revealed.

One such study, appearing in the Annals of Family Medicine, gathered 193 mature adults with depressive symptoms and provided either individualized physical activity or social visits for six consecutive months. Researchers concluded that: “Social contact may be as effective as physical activity in improving mood and quality of life” and “social participation and social support networks are paramount to long-term positive outcomes and psychological well-being.’

Another study that appeared in The American Journal of Public Health demonstrated that those aged 50 to 60 who were socially active had slower rates of declining memory. “The working hypothesis is that social engagement is what makes you mentally engaged,” Lisa F. Berkman, the study’s senior author, told the NY Times. The American Academy of Neurology studied the relationship between dementia, stress, and socialization and found that “people who are socially active and not easily stressed may be less likely to develop dementia”. 

Improved nutrition: The need for proper nutrition is vital, but healthy habits can be difficult to maintain when eating alone.  Socializing with others and sharing a meal is a motivator for better food choices.  Noone likes to eat alone on a regular basis and often meals are skipped or are not sufficient in nutrition.    

Improved physical health: Multiple studies have also revealed that an active social life can boost the immune system, lower blood pressure, and reduce physical pain that is reinforced by depression.

Strength in numbers: When it comes to socializing, the more the merrier. Those in large groups are more likely to encourage healthy habits among each other, including exercise, and there is always someone to talk to when you need support. 

How can those age 55+ stay socially connected?

While it’s comforting for mature adults to know they have family, sufficient social interaction includes participation or consistently engaging with others, the best being with peers.

Making that call or reaching out to join an organization can be difficult. It is often uncomfortable to step out of our current comfort zone.  It may take some gentle encouragement to get more socially involved, but the benefits of an active social lifestyle reach well into the future.

Laura Kay House, MA, is the founder and owner of Silver Connections, located in the Triangle area of North Carolina. Silver Connections provides numerous socializing opportunities through events and travel, quality members and new connections for age 55+, active and single adults.

http://www.silverconnections.org